Residential rehabilitation: powering up in 2021

Our contributor David McCartney has a post over at the Scottish Health Action on Alcohol Problems blog. It's worth your time. “Rehab? What’s the point of it? There’s no evidence that it works. I don’t refer anyone to rehab. Do you?”The addiction worker was talking to a colleague – another practitioner working in the field. … Continue reading Residential rehabilitation: powering up in 2021

Meaning and purpose in the context of opioid overdose deaths

Austin Brown recently tweeted a link to an editorial from Drug and Alcohol Dependence which is, unfortunately, behind a paywall. The editorial was written by Eric Strain, the outgoing Editor in Chief, reflecting on the research he's observed in his 15 years as an editor. Coincidentally, it articulates the core message of my blogging over … Continue reading Meaning and purpose in the context of opioid overdose deaths

Recovery and Community with Anna Byberg and Matt Statman

https://open.spotify.com/episode/0UDj8r1qQD9MlbPLfZb3Md?si=GGrfbVF-RT-HtutJiDzn5A This podcast involves three of my favorite people. It's a conversation about recovery in the context of community. It's brief and well worth your time. Enjoy! Derek Wolfe created and hosts Vital Discussions. He's a medical student who will be starting a psychiatry residency soon. The podcast focuses on the medical community. We met … Continue reading Recovery and Community with Anna Byberg and Matt Statman

Cannabis as an “adjunctive treatment” for MAT patients?

Those harm reduction initiatives are great. I would say ‘keep doing that’. But also give people the opportunity to get well because that mantra of ‘keep them alive, keep them alive’ isn’t good enough. As a person in long-term recovery, I see it as a lack of ambition. It’s disrespectful to assume I am not … Continue reading Cannabis as an “adjunctive treatment” for MAT patients?

Pick your poison — blame or pessimism?

Source: Kelly et al. (2020) What's more harmful? Blame or pessimism? Kelly et al. find that 'chronically relapsing brain disease' was associated less stigmatizing blame and more pessimism about their capacity to recover, while 'problem' was associated with more stigmatizing blame and more optimism for their capacity to recover. ...exposure to the ‘chronically relapsing brain … Continue reading Pick your poison — blame or pessimism?