Not God

One atheist AA member shares her story:

It wasn’t magic; it was brutally hard work to get from point A to B. I do believe I’d be dead without the help of the people and the structure of the steps in AA.

But I don’t believe in God.

9 thoughts on “Not God

      1. Know it well.

        I just want to understand your message without assuming I know what you mean.

        It’s your “then” that’s not clear to me.

        What, exactly, are you responding to and what, in particular, in how it works are you directing us to?

        Thanks.

  1. You know, to me, that is a whole contradiction in beliefs. Absolutely I agree with the first part, it was the HARDEST thing I’ve had to do in my life. When I went to treatment in 2002, I had a new lease on life. Went to college, got a job I truly loved (hated the agency, but that’s another thing entirely) but chose to relapse in 2008 for a year. Lost it all, as many of us do, and ended up back in treatment in 2009 and shortly will have 2 years of recovery. For me I could not even entertain the fact that it was all me and not God. Wow. But I do respect other peoples opinions, including atheism and I would love to hear their point of view of how they did it. That concept has no place in my recovery or life, but that doesn’t mean the other person is totally wrong in how they think. Anyway I would love to hear how others got where they are….and how they do in their daily lives. Thanks for letting me share. Moe

    1. You said you don’t believe in God. In how it works it says this one is God. May you find him now

  2. @Tim – That was a quote from the author of that book.

    However, I am in recovery and not a believer in anything that I think I could accurately call God.

    I’m grateful every day for:
    the decision to insert “as we understood him”;
    the decision to break off from the Oxford Group
    the old timers who told me not to worry about it and use Good Orderly Direction or Group of Drunks;
    these words from the 12 & 12, “You can, if you wish, make A.A., itself your ‘higher power.’ Here’s a very large group of people who have solved their alcohol problem. In this respect they are certainly a power greater than you, who have not even come close to a solution.”

    I do believe that the world is organized in certain ways. For example, people who do what the program teaches tend to recover and do well, while my life was characterized by one disaster after another until I accepted this fact. I tried to fight it, but this is a power greater than me. I don’t know why this is so and I probably never will. Some people explain this with God. I can’t explain it. But, I know this is a power greater than me and I know I’m not God.

  3. The Big Book is the program, and people can say what they want. But from what you said seems they too need to get back into the Big Book.

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