Who’s “we”?

This article is making the rounds and getting some attention. The post below addresses the issues raised. (originally posted on 10/31/2014) ==================================== This article has been forwarded to me by several people. Its author has been writing a series of articles that seek to redefine addiction and recovery. As Eve Tushnet recently observed, "There’s another narrative, … Continue reading Who’s “we”?

Reducing overdoses

A new leader in the Open Society Institute shares a sensible perspective on reducing overdoses: Looking ahead, reducing drug overdoses will require major shifts in how we approach substance use. First, and possibly most importantly, Maryland needs to connect individuals struggling with addiction to high-quality addiction treatment that is integrated with their primary care. Primary care providers … Continue reading Reducing overdoses

Who’s “we”?

This article has been forwarded to me by several people. Its author has been writing a series of articles that seek to redefine addiction and recovery. As Eve Tushnet recently observed, "There’s another narrative, though, which is emerging at sites like The Fix and Substance.com." This sentence is representative of this alternative narative: "The addiction field has struggled … Continue reading Who’s “we”?

sustained guidance into full cultural participation

I've posted recently on the role of class in addiction, policy, treatment and recovery. Here are a couple of sentences from Bill White on the topic. Those individuals needing professionally directed addiction treatment suffer from more than a singular, encapsulated problem with alcohol or other drugs. Need for addiction treatment—particularly prolonged or repeated treatment—is often a proxy … Continue reading sustained guidance into full cultural participation