Too expensive? (2015)

I frequently point to health professional recovery programs when discussing the effectiveness of drug-free treatment when it's delivered in the appropriate dose, frequency and duration. They have stellar outcomes. (More details here.) The programs were abstinence-based, requiring physicians to abstain from any use of alcohol or other drugs of abuse as assessed by frequent random … Continue reading Too expensive? (2015)

Chemical Dependency & The Family – from the Dawn Farm Education Series

This program will provide participants with a basic understanding of how addiction impacts each member of a family. The About the presenter will describe the roles and behaviors that family members often acquire when living with addiction, ways in which each family member is affected by addiction in the family, and options for family members … Continue reading Chemical Dependency & The Family – from the Dawn Farm Education Series

Intervention – Dawn Farm Education Series

This program will describe how the "Love First" process of Intervention can help chemically dependent people find recovery. Key elements of the "Love First" model for effective intervention with addicted individuals will be discussed. This program will bring PRACTICAL INFORMATION, HELP and HOPE to anyone who cares about a chemically dependent person, and to anyone … Continue reading Intervention – Dawn Farm Education Series

Recovery Checkups

Bill White on efforts to develop and implement recovery check-up protocols: There is one sentence in the Standards that deserves particular acknowledgement:  "Recovery check-ups by addiction specialist physicians, just as those by primary care physicians or other providers, may promote sustained recovery and prevent relapse" (p. 13). . . . The "recovery check-up" language marks … Continue reading Recovery Checkups

Personal Failure or System Failure?

Bill White explaining why inadequate treatment may be worse than no treatment: What we know from primary medicine is that ineffective treatments (via placebo effects) or an inadequate dose of a potentially effective treatment (e.g., as in antibiotic treatment of bacterial infections) may temporarily suppress symptoms.  Such treatments create the illusion of resumed health, but … Continue reading Personal Failure or System Failure?

The Unintended Consequences Of Medical “Maximalism”

The Health Affairs blog questions the American Heart Association's maximalist approach with the use of statins. The issues sound familiar. The policy implications of these guidelines are staggering. Estimates show that if these recommendations are fully implemented, close to a third of all Americans will be placed on a statin. But these developments beg the … Continue reading The Unintended Consequences Of Medical “Maximalism”