We All Want to Flourish, Those Served in Substance Use Care Deserve Nothing Less

A few weeks back, fellow writer and colleague Jason Schwartz posted a piece titled Meaning and purpose in the context of opioid overdose deaths. It and the related article of the same title written by outgoing Editor in Chief, Dr. Eric Strain of Drug and Alcohol Dependence deeply resonated with me. Dr Strain lists some … Continue reading We All Want to Flourish, Those Served in Substance Use Care Deserve Nothing Less

Recovery: What Is It Good For?

Beyond one’s personal recovery, what could the general idea of recovery be good for? To explore what the idea of recovery could be good for, I would like to separate the word “recovery” from its normal use (about people making personal changes in the face of addiction illness), and highlight some other benefits that could be found in the idea of … Continue reading Recovery: What Is It Good For?

Growing older and more stigmatised on methadone

In a compelling study from Dublin, Paula Mayock and Shane Butler (Trinity College) make the point that little is known about the stigma experienced by individuals attending drug treatment services over prolonged periods.  They explored this through the lived-experience narratives of 25 people prescribed long-term methadone. Their findings ‘reveal the intersection of stigma with age … Continue reading Growing older and more stigmatised on methadone

My favorite resources on the history of Narcotics Anonymous

Here is an audio/video upload of a presentation called “Narcotics Anonymous: The Early Story.” I’ve listened to it time and again. This fascinating talk has been given at NA World, and on various continents and regions of the globe. My other favorite is this bit of writing titled “Narcotics Anonymous: Its History and Culture.”   … Continue reading My favorite resources on the history of Narcotics Anonymous

Stigma, humanizing terms, and taking on hostility: A little more

Earlier today Jason Schwartz posted on the notion that the word “relapse” is stigmatizing, that the preferred term is “recurrence of use”, and the lack of empirical evidence addressing this topic. I will add a little more. “Relapse” is currently my preferred term rather than “recurrence of use”. Why? In clinical work focused on relapse … Continue reading Stigma, humanizing terms, and taking on hostility: A little more